Judge Rules Google Didn’t Infringe GeoTag’s Location-based Search Patent, but Denies Bid to Invalidate Asserted Claims

  • April 24, 2014

This week a redacted memorandum opinion was released in Google’s battle against GeoTag in Delaware District Court. Judge Richard Andrews has granted Google’s motion for summary judgment of non-infringement of a location-based search patent asserted by GeoTag against over 400 companies, many of which are Google customers. The patent-in-suit relates to a software interface that organizes information on the basis of geographic location and allows users to search a remote database (5,930,474). Since July 2010 GeoTag has filed more than 100 suits alleging infringement of ‘474, targeting web-based mapping services that find and display business locations and job openings. The defendants in these cases include technology and software companies, social networking sites, retail stores, and restaurants and range from mid-size businesses to Fortune 500 companies. In March 2011 Microsoft and Google sought a declaratory judgment that GeoTag’s ‘474 patent was invalid and was not infringed by their web mapping services. According to the complaint, many of Microsoft’s and Google’s customers requested indemnity and defense as a result of GeoTag’s myriad lawsuits. In response GeoTag filed counterclaims for infringement of ‘474, accusing Microsoft’s Bing services and careers feature and multiple Google products including AdWords.


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