After Jury Invalidates Network Processor Patent, Judge Orders Stragent to Pay Intel’s Court Costs

  • April 10, 2014

In a final judgment issued this week, a Texas district judge ruled that Intel owes nothing to Stragent in a battle over network processor patents. Further, said Judge Timothy Dyk, Stragent is ordered to pay Intel’s court costs in the nearly three-year-long case. In August 2011 Stragent and SeeSaw Foundation, a non-profit Texas entity, sued Intel for alleged infringement of three patents related to network processors that perform cyclic redundancy checks (6,848,072, 7,028,244, 7,320,102). The complaint stated that SeeSaw was the owner of the patents-in-suit, which were licensed exclusively to Stragent according to the plaintiffs, and accused Intel’s Xeon 7500 processor series with 7500 chipsets of infringement. During litigation, Intel submitted multiple filings and letter briefs to the court maintaining that all of the asserted claims of the patents were invalid. In August 2013 the parties stipulated to limit the asserted claims for trial to only Claims 12 and 16 of ‘072 and Claims 1, 3, and 4 of ‘244. Following a five-day trial, a jury found that Intel had not infringed ‘072 and determined Claims 12 and 16 to be invalid. The jury verdict released on March 14, 2014 is limited to only ‘072, but the final judgment issued by Judge Dyk this week also dismissed with prejudice Stragent’s infringement claims as to ‘244.


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